What should I do if the cow is in trouble, and the calf cannot get out?

There are 6 answers
Butterfly
Butterfly
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:16
If I gave birth, I should have come out. If not got out, then did not give birth to the end. Help the cow in this case - gently and with clean hands pull the calf (just not much!) - so help the cow to give birth faster. And if there is an opportunity to get quick help from a veterinarian, then call him.
Best
Asetruks
Asetruks
Thank you!
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:21, Butterfly |
Butterfly
Butterfly
Read the answer below, it's better there!
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:32, Butterfly |
Butterfly
Butterfly
Write later, if everything is normal.
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:35, Butterfly |
Ashley
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:21
Read on this site. There are pictures there. This is from there: "If you have gloves to the shoulders, put them on. After you have applied a little grease on the gloves, get inside the cow (through the birth canal or vagina, but not through the anus) to determine how the calf is inside the cow. When standing backwards, do not try to turn the calf over.Throw special obstetric ropes (with loops) or good elastic cables and gently pull it out as soon as possible. Do this only if the rear legs have already appeared. With a breech breech (when the calf's tail first appears), you will need to position the hind legs of the calf so that they are in the delivery channel. To do this, push the fetus into the uterus as much as possible. Then, the bent knee joint must be pulled out and the fetal joint drawn into the pelvic cavity. Push the knee and putovy joints bent together over the upper edge of the entrance to the pelvis (which is behind your hands) into the birth canal using obstetric ropes. The same must be done with the second limb. Then throw maternity ropes or cables and drag them outside. When tilting the head or dropping the head down, push the calf into the uterus, hold the calf by the muzzle with one hand, and, holding it with the other hand, bring the head to its normal position. If you cannot reach the head of the calf, then stick your fingers into the corner of your mouth to turn your head slightly towards you. Then do the above steps to turn the head. When bending the forelimb or carp previa, push the calf back inside along the birth canal, grasp the bent leg and push the calf strongly inward to bend the knee. Then secure the knee, grab the hoof and gently return it to its normal position. When bending the limb at the elbow, you need to push the calf back to correct the position of the leg or joint. In the case of a bent leg, pushing the calf inside, you can immediately correct the wrong position. In the case of bending in the elbow joint, it is necessary to push the calf back through the delivery channel, while grasping the leg bent more than the other and pulling it. After that, the calf will easily come out. "
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Ashley
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:22
If the calf is in a normal position or in a position in which you can pull it out, Put on a pair of obstetric cords or elastic cables (not synthetic twine, since they are usually too thin and cutting to use during birth) . Use a double overlap knot to put on the calf: one loop on a putt joint, and another under the knees.Pull out and down during, and stop when there are no contractions. If you have a special delivery device, be careful when pulling the calf out, because you can easily harm him if you use this device incorrectly. The obstetric aid should have a U-shaped part, thrown over the back of a cow with a chain that attaches this part to the base of the tail of the cow and with separate chains that attach to the legs of the calf and a lever that helps pull the calf out. Properly tighten the chains. As soon as you reach the desired voltage, gently push the lever and work synchronously with the cows' contractions. If you put more effort than necessary, then remove the fixture, then put it on again and tighten the chains. Repeat until the need for this device disappears (when the calf is already half visible), then quickly disconnect the chains from the device and do the rest of the work with your hands. When the calf is born, it is necessary to immediately normalize his breathing. With the help of your fingers, clean the respiratory tract of the calf from the amniotic fluid.Tickle the calf's nostrils with a dry straw or drip water into your ear so that it shakes its head, or, if necessary, resort to using artificial respiration for the calf to breathe. The calf should begin to breathe 30-60 seconds after birth.
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Ashley
For cows who are trying to give birth lying down, but whose calf is still in the wrong position, stretch the legs of the cow back and ask someone to raise its tail. This will make it easier for you to get inside and correct the calf's position without fear that a cow might kick you. Correcting the position of the muzzle or legs of the calf with the help of hands allows you to avoid damage to the uterine wall, which can cause infection after calving. Pulling out and down repeats the movements in which cows give birth in natural conditions. The pelvic part of the cow pushes the calf out and down. Thus, the pressure on the pelvic region is reduced, which makes it easier for the cow to calve. If a cow gives birth while standing, then you will have to be behind her, pulling the calf. If the calf is too large to pass through the reproductive canal, or if the cow itself is still too young for childbirth, then it is necessary to resort to the help of a cesarean section. Always watch the cow when the moment of birth is right, and know where she is, so you can easily find her if she needs help. Do not wait a day or two after the cow showed the first signs of labor. If signs of childbirth have begun and she hasn’t rested within one or two hours, drive her to a pen where you can help her. Calves, all four limbs of which are in the delivery canal or those that are back, the most difficult to bring to the desired position, and it is best to use cesarean section. When entering the delivery canal, push the calf back, as this will encourage the cow to push it back, which will help you bring it to the desired position.
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:24, Ashley |
Ashley
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:26
Here's another tip - If there is a difficulty in getting the calf out of the birth canal. In this case, it is necessary to tie the calf's legs with a rope and pull it out. After that, the calf is put on a clean cloth, clear the nostrils and mouth from mucus, cut the umbilical cord (the instrument must be disinfected) and scorch with iodine. Then the calf is given to the cow so that it is licked, and then, already dry, is transferred to a warm room, covered with straw. After giving birth, the cow is given a bucket of warm salt water and some high-quality hay, waiting for the afterbirth for about five hours, after which it is buried (in case of stagnation, a doctor will be required). After five days, a healthy, born cow can be walked outside.
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Ashley
Answered on January 28, 2015 16:28
And yet - With the bent forelimbs or the bend of the head, the calf must be pushed back and then pulled forward the wrong part. In that case, if the rear part of the calf is located closer to the vagina, then it is necessary to rotate it so that the rear limbs can be pulled out. When performing any internal operations, it is important to ensure that the hand is located between the wall of the uterus and the part of the fetus that is straightened. If this condition is not met, uterine rupture may occur. If the fetus is positioned correctly, the cow is only helped if the fetus is retained in the birth canal. If necessary, use a rope that is tied to the limbs of the calf. Pull the rope is necessary only during natural contractions at the cow. In order not to infect the infection, it is necessary to keep clean. Help is also needed if the amniotic fluid is withdrawn, and the calf does not come out within thirty to forty minutes.